Linnaeus Arboretum

Page 5

Butterfly populations at historic lows

Monarch Butterfly on goldenrod flower If you’ve seen a Monarch butterfly recently, (or any butterfly, for that matter) consider yourself lucky.  As gardeners, wildlife-watchers and insect-lovers can all attest, there has been a considerable shortage of the graceful creatures in our area so far this summer.  The common yellow sulfurs aren’t so common, and the […]

The Leaning Tower of Perry

After a long hiatus, we’re finally seeing some rapid change in Perry the Corpse Flower (Amorphophallus titanum). Almost exactly two years after beginning to grow, and reaching maturity about four months later, the titanic leaf is rapidly senescing. We’ve been watching what has appeared to be the onset of dormancy for many months, but just […]

Don’t get burned by wild parsnip

Although it appears harmless this wild parsnip, combined with sunlight, can cause tremendous skin damage to its unsuspecting victims. Wild parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) grows wild – often in road ditches and abandoned areas – and is a member of the carrot family, closely related to the cultivated parsnips you might grow in your garden. It […]

Giant Water Bug Takes a Stroll on Campus

This past Wednesday some observant students found this Giant Water Bug taking a stroll on one of the campus’ sidewalk. These interesting big bugs find themselves in freshwater streams and ponds for most of their lives. Giant water bugs use a pointy protrusion at their rear end to act as a snorkel, allowing them to […]

Pasqueflowers in bloom (finally)

Pasqueflowers in bloom Prairie wildflower season has officially begun.  Pasqueflower (Anemone patens) is the earliest blooming flower on the prairie.  These were just photographed at Kasota Prairie today, and the pasqueflowers near the rock outcrop prairie overlook site in the Arboretum will soon be following suit.  The name means “Easter flower” and these plants usually […]

Junco Madness

This strange heaping of snow has stalled spring and left the dark-eyed Juncos in a frenzy searching for food at the Arboretum bird-feeders. It looks like a bustling bird food court out there! Juncos are a common type of sparrow who are often seen flitting about beneath the edges of trees. They have a light […]

Webster speaks on “Psychology of Evil”

Dr. Russ Webster gave the lecture at the most recent Soup and Sandwich Seminar event at the Arboretum.  The topic was “The Psychology of Evil”.  Dr. Webster is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Psychological Science Department at Gustavus.  His research includes such topics as prejudice and discrimination, “magical thinking” (superstition, fantasy and other emotional […]

First Day of Spring

No signs of spring in the Arboretum yet.   But don’t worry…  it’s coming.  

Grisly bird mystery

owl and jay locked in a grisly mystery This is a photo taken by Art Straub near Henderson in mid March of this year.  It is a red phase eastern screech owl and a blue jay found dead together in the snow.  Art said that when the photo was taken, the bodies were still warm, […]

What is that Clump of Leaves in the Tree?

           It is winter and the leaves have left the trees bare. At first sight there is not much besides the bark and branches. A closer look reveals a clump of leaves and sticks that is messy and quite large in appearance. Upon further investigation, it appears to be a grey squirrel nest.             Grey […]